Product Roadmap Prioritization

The unmet needs in your customer’s job-to-be-done provide the foundation to make smart decisions about which customer problem to tackle first and the order in which you should deliver solutions.

Each job typically has about 100 customer needs. You can prioritize the needs by calculating the difference between the importance and satisfaction scores. The needs with higher importance and lower satisfaction are top priority. When you’re choosing which product features to build now and which to postpone–making tradeoffs–choose the features that satisfy the top priority needs better than the existing solutions in the market.

The same mindset can be used to plan your roadmap. A great roadmap will balance cost, today’s impact, and tomorrow’s promise. During your idea generation, you may have come up with some brilliant ideas that will take a long time to build or be very expensive to execute. This doesn’t mean you should ditch them. You just need to figure out how to increment your way to the brilliant idea while meeting customer needs better and better along the way.

This is step 1 of your roadmap planning: Determine the incremental improvements that will take you from where you are today to where you want to be tomorrow, getting the whole job done faster and more reliably than the existing solutions. Step 2 is to determine which of those incremental improvements to tackle first. The criteria for this prioritization is the extent to which the improvements serve unmet needs. You prioritize the work that tackles the most important and least satisfied needs.

Without good customer metrics, such as needs in the job-to-be-done, companies often prioritize their roadmap based on a imprecise projection of business impact, the charisma of people lobbying for the features they like, and the “HiPPO” (the Highest Paid Person’s Opinion). All of these methods are subjective and/or based on unreliable premises.

Your product roadmap (and your tradeoffs) should not be prioritized by your team. They should be prioritized by your customer’s unmet needs in the job.